Saturday, September 8, 2012

How to reset your leptin - part 1

Hi folks, yes, I AM reading. 

Recently I saw a commenter wanting to know of other ways to do a leptin reset.  Both Drs. Rosedale and Kruse feel that they have the answers to this.  Their plans are quite similar.  Both call for a low carb paleo/style diet, limiting feedlot meats, cow's milk, and fake foods.  Both limit snacking after dinner and don't recommend lots of exercise.  Both would agree that a can of sardines is the most ideal meal/snack, although it looks like Kruse would rather you have them raw, with the heads on, and in the blender.

They differ in the amount of protein.  Rosedale's protein recommendation is quite low compared to Kruse's.  Their passionate arguments are on Paleohacks, if you even dare to go over there, but here's the gist.  Rosedale thinks protein should be kept low to limit gluconeogenesis, and that doing so can also reduce the risk of cancer.  Kruse says that doesn't matter, because the diet already reduces the risk of cancers.

To me, the Kruse argument is a little bit of "if you do what I say, and get so-and-so into balance, then it is not a problem".  I think he might be putting the cart before the horse.  It doesn't really address the transition phase.  Rosedale's plan also limits fat in the early weeks.  He said that he is a big fan of coconut oil, but did not put that in his book due to the editor/publisher pressure.

Kruse is trying to elicit certain outcomes by limiting food during certain intervals.  In order to keep from being hungry during that time, he front-loads with plenty of protein at breakfast.  Rosedale says not only is that not necessary, it is detrimental, since it encourages gluconeogenesis.  He feels people would be better off if they ate when they were hungry and that snacking is not a problem as long as there aren't many carbs in the snacks.  I think he might be putting the cart before the horse, too.  When people get adapted to the lower-protein, low carb approach, they are fine with fat-burning, they lose their hunger and then it is easy to not constantly snack or to constantly be snacking on protein.  The first few days can be really tough for people.

Rosedale's book came out in the 90's, and to me at least, it is the first "paleo" diet book out there.  He is working on two new books, but seriously, Rosedale, you need to finish them.

My personal experience with both diets I will cover in another post.  But I'll add here that I follow a modified Rosedale plan now.  I did well on the leptin reset, but after awhile I gained all the weight back.  I found that Kruse's leptin reset plan elicited many positive changes for me, but lots of weight loss wasn't one of them.  Restricting my protein has been more helpful.

If you want to learn more about the two protein approaches, read Jimmy Moore's posts about his n=1 experiment with the ketone blood monitor, and also his recent ATLCE podcast featuring Dr. Layman.  Dr. Layman is an expert in protein.

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