Thursday, January 10, 2013

This Just in for 2013 - Atkins beats out Paleo for the best diet

Yippie!, for the low carb diet!  (OH, as a woo-fueled low-carb jihaddist, I just had to start with this.  Sorry, and now, where was I?)

US News and World report has released it's yearly popularity poll comprehensive study of the best diets.  This year was even better, since the panel of experts did exhaustive and robust research.

The result?  The Atkins beat out the Paleo diet.  In fact, the Paleo diet came in dead last this year.  Na na na na na.

I sure am glad the research was so robust as to winnow all that mess down the bestest and highest diets, like the experts own DASH diet, which for most of us, just means that clothing store the Kardashians have in Calabasas, not something you do so your butt will look smaller.  And THANK GOODNESS doe's beechs of paleo weeeeded out that awful dangerous and disastrous epi-paleo guru before that disastrous and dangerous epi-paleo diet entered into the running.

There is an interesting category this year, the best diet for type 2 diabetes.  It is interesting because it finally outs what researchers have been hiding from us all along, and that is the great results that diabetics have been having on the diets that are on the top of this list.  The experts polled seem to have an affinity for the vegetarian plans.  I guess the cat is out of the bag that eating meat causes lots of problems with your insulin.  Here's the study.  [Note:  I'll have to fix that link as soon as some sort of study like that actually gets published, Ed.]

While I can certainly understand why the weighty obesity and diet experts are cautious about recommending any diet that does not have the gold-standard, crossover, multi-attitudinal, randomized, blind clinical study, I was not aware of all the great studies that have been going on at the leading edge of the oncoming wave of the tsunami that is obesity research.  Diets such as the "Biggest Loser", "Flexitarian" and "Engine 2" diets have washed up onto the scene only recently, and the trials have resulted in positive results for obesity, heart disease and type 2 diabetes.  This is why they received much higher scores than those scantily-data'd lower carb diets.  You can read about all these studies here here and here. [Sorrrrry again, maybe someday I'll get around to fixing this, Ed.]

One take-away I got from this groundbreaking and robust study is that it exceeded even my expectations of a study where the percentage of registered dietitians exceeded 50 percent.

No comments:

Post a Comment